University of Strathclyde US, UK and EU Flags Takes you to the main page for this section

SPP 408

Title: GOING PUBLIC WITH PRIVATE OPINIONS: ARE POST-COMMUNIST CITIZENS AFRAID TO SAY WHAT THEY THINK?
 
Author: Professor Richard Rose
 
Description: In Communist regimes, the party-state used fear to make subjects say what the party wanted in public, whatever they thought privately. The 2004/5 round of the New Europe Barometer (NEB) survey in 13 post-Communist countries therefore collected an indicator of whether respondents remain afraid to say what they think: overall 51 percent indicated some fear, 45 percent did not and 4 percent replied don’t know. Five hypotheses are tested about why some people are afraid to voice opinions while others are not: the failure of all of them to account for differences implies a random distribution of fear. The paper then considers whether fearful people differ in their answers to political questions about partisanship and approval of the political system net of socio-economic characteristics and attitudes. They do not. The conclusion considers the implications of publicly expressed opinions, whether freely given or not, for undemocratic as well as democratic political systems.

Read an Abstract
 
Price: £3.00
 
Postal Address:    CSPP Publications, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XQ, UK

Add to shopping list



CSPP School of Government & Public Policy U. of Strathclyde Glasgow G1 1XQ Scotland
Email: cspp@strath.ac.uk